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In the quest for team success, how can organizations and/or decision makers find the right balance between quantitative and qualitative approaches? Considering that every team is unique and influenced by different factors such as sociocultural, legal, or political environments, and remote work, what are some effective strategies for striking the right balance? Also, what role does gut feeling and experience play in achieving this balance?

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Jan 31Liked by Mike Fisher

Many company surveys now ask employees about their feelings of psychological safety. As a leader, it's important to help them understand the components of true psychological safety. As you correctly highlight, is not an environment that is "nice" and absent of tough conversations. On the contrary, a lack of those types of conversations is likely a symptom of an absence of psychological safety. I've found that in order to get accurate feedback on the level of psychological safety in an organization, it's important that everyone has the same definition and indicators of a safe environment.

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The ability to speak openly about challenges without fear of humiliation is important. It can be a little tricky as a leader because you must get adept at realizing the time and place to share such things, but within the context of teams executing on goals, healthy dialog is absolutely crucial. Really enjoyed this article, thanks for the links to check out!

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